Law Office of Daniel E. Forrest, P.A.

Florida law provides for the award of several different types of alimony as part of divorce proceedings. Some spouses may receive permanent alimony, while others may receive temporary alimony until the divorce is finalized.

One of the most common types of spousal support is rehabilitative alimony. This type helps the lower-earning spouse receive limited assistance while he or she goes through retraining or acquires additional education so that he or she can reenter the workforce. The goal is to provide help for a finite period of time so that the recipient can become self-supporting. The court may be more willing to grant this type of alimony when the party has potential or a background that demonstrates that he or she can establish or re-establish a viable career. For example, if the party had quit college to care for the couple's children, the court may award rehabilitative alimony for a reasonable period of time that would allow the recipient to complete his or her education.

Courts may set specific time limits regarding how long the paying party will be required to provide this support. Additionally, they may set other parameters on the award. For example, the court may inform the recipient of the need for him or her to earn some income to provide for his or her own support. In some instances, the court may be willing to grant an extension of a spousal support award if the recipient has a valid reason for the extension.

Individuals who believe that they are entitled to receive ongoing spousal support after a divorce may choose to discuss this issue with a family law attorney. Alimony is not awarded in every case, and the attorney can explain the factors that are evaluated in determining whether such an award is appropriate.

Source: National Paralegal College, "Types of Alimony / Spousal Support", November 03, 2014

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